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saltwort:

A trip to the Cloisters this past weekend fell through so I was forced to sate my unicorn desires through my own means.

(via obsessivelygalahad)

Source: saltwort
Photo Set

lexxercise:

Personal sketch based on this excellent comic about a lady knight and her willowy poet boyfriend by 16ruedelaverrerie.

(via missingrache)

Source: lexxercise
Photo
officialbluearmy:

latenightalaska:

I SERIOUSLY THOUGHT THIS WAS A COPPER STATUE

HELLHOUND

officialbluearmy:

latenightalaska:

I SERIOUSLY THOUGHT THIS WAS A COPPER STATUE

HELLHOUND

(via roachpatrol)

Source: tastefullyoffensive
Photo

laughterkey:

derelictjet:

mindofgemini:

goldist:

malformalady:

The Black Dragonfish(Idiacanthus atlanticus) of the Stomiidae family.

I love how this is like a creature from hell but it has like little pink cheeks 

deep sea anime blush stickers

fun fact those pink cheeks glow to attract unsuspecting prey

fashionable and functional with a dash of abject terror

My aesthetic.

(via seananmcguire)

Source: malformalady
Photo Set

kia-kaha-winchesters:

shogunofyellow:

nature is rad

These are the most stunning nature photos I have ever seen

(via liz-of-all-ladybirds)

Source: shogunofyellow
Text

ultimateventist:

charlesoberonn:

If something is ‘old as fuck’ then it’s about 1.2 billion years old because that’s when life evolved sexual reproduction.

 

(via trexila)

Source: charlesoberonn
Quote

"And I am aware of my heart: it opens and closes
Its bowl of red blooms out of sheer love for me.
The water I taste is warm and salt, like the sea,
And comes from a country far away as health."

- Sylvia Plath, “Tulips,” from Ariel: The Restored Edition (via lifeinpoetry)
Source: lifeinpoetry
Text

missingrache:

iguanafish:

you know the anachronistic nature of a semi-feudal monarchic society turned seedy film noir city means that someone could quite legitimately tip their fedora and say “m’lady”

This is super important.

Source: iguanafish
Photo Set

WHAT IF AUCaptain America: The Winter Soldier, role swap (Sharon, Steve, Bucky, Natasha)

(via driftcompatib1e)

Source: loveholic198
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warrenellis:

He would emerge at night wearing iron goggles, with a whalebone umbrella resting on his shoulder.  He could be seen by moonlight, gathering plants and planting witch bottles, but he moved without sound.  The goggles, it was said, allowed him to see The Other World, the parish of ghosts and demons, and he proclaimed his status to villagers and supplicants alike as “The Devil’s Master.”  On his…

View On WordPress

Source: warrenellis
Photo Set

jackviolet:

One of the things that is really notable about Moscow and yet not many people outside Russia know about, is how gorgeous the Moscow metro is.

These photos? That’s what the metro stations look like.

Yeah.

They’re called the “People’s palaces of Moscow” or else “Underground palaces,” and they were built during the Soviet era on the Communist idea that art and beauty should belong to the people rather than only being available in the houses of nobles.

These photos show just some of the metro’s attractions. There are many more mosaics, statues, etc, placed throughout.

And the metro is always this clean.

In addition to being beautiful, it is incredibly functional. It gets you pretty much everywhere in Moscow, and the trains run at intervals of every three minutes or less. At peak times, they run every 90 seconds. You never have to worry about missing a train, because the next one will come almost immediately.

Not always of course. In the late evening or early morning hours, you may have to wait as long as five whole minutes for a train. They’re also super easy to navigate.

We Russians are pretty proud of our metro system.

(via halberdierminister)

Source: jackviolet
Answer
  • Question: Was there any sort of casual attire during the Victorian times? All you ever see are there lavish gowns and and men dressed in waistcoats. What did people wear when just lounging about at home, readind a book etc? Were they constantly all dressed up and just generally uncomfortable? Obviously sweatpants and ratty t-shirts were not part of their wardrobe, but they had to have something along those lines....right? - Anonymous
  • Answer:

    operafantomet:

    As I wrote in this post two days ago, the mid and late 19th century was a society with very specific rules as to what to dress in, when, and where. 

    An upper class lady could end up changing her attire 6-7 times a day, so she was suitably dressed for each occasion - dressing gown for breakfast, maybe a riding or tennis outfit after breakfast if she did sport, or a house dress if she just stayed at home, visit/walking day dresses, tea gowns, afternoon supper dress, elaborate ball or opera dresses in the evening. And then of course it was the night gown. A woman of lower rank would not go through this attire changing frenzie, but changing once or twice a day was not uncommon. 

    Of these, the dressing gown and the tea gown were informal. Both were loose garments often in wrapping style, but especially the tea gown could be elaborate enough to receive guests in: 
    image


    Men had corresponding items - silk dressing gowns and smoking jackets. The latter was used after dinner when the men retracted to the smoking salon. There they changed their jacket, so they wouldn’t offend the nose of sensible women when they returned to the party. The former was used informally at home, when enjoying the paper, doing light office work, or if receiving close friends. When worn over a silk pajama or a shirt they were perfectly acceptable to be seen in. 

    image

    Reason why you often don’t see these at museums is that they’re harder to put on display. For the attire to make sense, you need to have several garments underneath - pajamas, undergowns, undies - and you often need to explain a lot of context. And they’re kinda shapeless too. When people look at the blue dress overneath, they think maternity dress. Formal dresses and suits are so much easier to deal with, and when a museum has limited space for the historical attires, they choose the easiest ones. Museums with more space will show you all the in-between and undie garments as well, though. V&A in London, for example. OH MAMA! 

Source: operafantomet
Photo Set

intheindigo:

sourcedumal:

note-a-bear:

ooooooh

OOOH LOOK AT THAT HISTORICAL ACCURACY THO

I think he’s the man that The 13th Warrior was loosely based upon.

(via obsessivelygalahad)

Source: everythingrhymeswithalcohol
Photo Set

sleepy hollow + tumblr text posts.

(via roachpatrol)

Source: hillsmaria
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floating-world-pictures:

I think it’s really interesting, albeit perhaps a bit premature, to think about Laura’s relationship to the gods, and specifically to Luci, through an Apollonian/Dionysian Hegelian dialectic.  (The reason I think this is interesting is because I am a horrid, boring graduate student.  I AM CASSANDRA OKAY I’M SORRY.)  1,500 word essay continues under the cut.

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Source: floating-world-pictures